Q: What if someone objects to or contests the will?Small Luke

A: If someone files an objection to the Will or produces another Will, what is known as a “Will contest” has begun. While Will contests are not that rare, and while few people actually win one, they can be extraordinarily costly and create incredible delays.

It’s also important to know that the requirements for contesting a will require a person to have “standing” to mount a contest.  Despite the fact that you feel your next door neighbor’s children ignored her and treated her badly. that does not give you the right to contest her will.  If, a person has proper standing to contest a will (ex: a child who was cut out of the Will by an angry parent, or even by a kindly parent who felt that the local charity, not his children, should get his assets) that person would have standing to bring a “Will contest”. If a Will gives one sibling 2/3rds of a parent’s estate and the other 1/3rd, the one receiving less has standing to bring a Will contest. Similarly, if a later Will is less favorable to someone than an earlier Will, or no Will at all, that person has standing. A Will contest sometimes is launched to have a different person, bank or trust company serve as Personal Representative for the estate, or as a trustee of Trusts created by the Will.

Q: What is the basis for a will contest?

A: Most of the challenges to invalidate Wills are by potential heirs or beneficiaries who got little or nothing. Questions on the validity of a Will must be filed in probate court within a certain number of days after receiving notice of the death or petition to admit the Will to probate.

The typical objections and unhappiness is not one of them are:

(1) the Will was not properly drawn, signed or witnessed, according to the state’s formal requirements;

(2) the decedent lacked mental capacity at the time the Will was executed;

(3) there was fraud, force or undue influence; or

(4) the Will was a forgery.

If the Will is held invalid, the probate court may invalidate all provisions or only the challenged portion. If the entire Will is held invalid, generally the proceeds are distributed under the laws of intestacy of the probating state.

Needless to say, if there is even the possibility of a Will contest, an experienced probate lawyer is a must.

Q: How can a will be “contested”?

A: A “contest” is usually mounted by the filing of the necessary documents with the probate court by an heir, prospective heir or another beneficiary. Each state has different time limits that control the window for filing. To successfully challenge a will, there must be sufficient evidence that the will was not created properly. Sour grapes or being upset that a person didn’t receive what they felt they had coming are not sufficient grounds for contesting a will. Typically, only certain factors are mandated by law to be contestable. These might encompass the incapacity or incompetence of the decedent at the time the will was prepared, fraudulent intent on the part of some parties to the will or undue influence or duress perpetrated on the decedent.

Q: What if there is no will?

A: If a person dies without a Will (known as dying “intestate”), the probate court appoints a Personal Representative frequently called an “Administrator” to receive all claims against the estate, pay creditors, and then distribute all remaining property in accordance with the laws of the state.

The major difference between dying testate and dying intestate is that without a valid Will an intestate estate is distributed to beneficiaries in accordance with the distribution plan established by state law; a testate estate is distributed in accordance with the instructions provided by the decedent in his/her Will.

Q: What happens if a will cannot be found?

A: Missing Wills raise all sorts of interesting legal issues which often turn on the specific facts and circumstances, and the law of the state in which the deceased resided.

The Will may be missing because the deceased intentionally revoked it, in which case, depending on state law, an earlier Will or the state’s rules on intestate succession would determine who gets the deceased’s estate.

Alternatively, the Will may be missing because it can be proven the Will was stored in a bank vault that was destroyed in an explosion and fire. In that case, the probate court may accept a photocopy of the Will (or the lawyer’s draft or computer file), together with evidence that the deceased duly signed the original.

Q: How can I find out if there was a will?

A: The first place to check is with the probate court in the County of the State where the deceased lived. In almost every case the Will, if filed, will be available to the public.

Anyone can get to see it, and for a modest fee, obtain a copy. If you are far away, a local lawyer or legal service bureau often can arrange to do a search and get a copy for you, at a relatively modest fee.

The fact that a person died — even if he or she “owned” substantial assets — does not mean that he or she actually had a Will, or that the Will was duly filed with the Court. In fact, if the deceased held property exclusively through a Living Trust or a joint ownership arrangement, there may not have been a need to file a Will, because the Trust did not “die” with the individual.  Also, with certain forms of joint ownership, the property usually passes to the other joint owners automatically.


IMPORTANT NOTE: Please be aware that the information on this page is delivered without warranty or guarantee of accuracy. It’s provided to help you learn more and formulate specific questions to discuss with your attorney and/or your Real Estate Professional and/or to help a personal representative, executor or executrix when executing their challenging responsibilities. By accessing this page, you acknowledge that it has been provided for INFORMATION ONLY and that you are hereby advised and fully aware that any decisions regarding probate issues should be discussed with an attorney and/or a Real Estate Professional.